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The Types Of Gas A Honda Civic Takes (Explained)

The Types Of Gas A Honda Civic Takes (Explained)

Being a subcompact sedan, the Honda Civic has been popular for many families. With rivals from other Japanese and Korean brands, the Honda Civic needs to keep up with the fierce competition in practicality and fuel economy.

There are two engines offered, a 2.0-liter and a 1.5-liter turbocharged in the current generation of Honda Civic. For both engines, Honda recommends a minimum of 87 octane rating for the CVT transmission. If you have a manual variant, Honda suggests using fuels with a minimum octane rating of 91.

The Honda Civic has been among the most popular sub-compact sedans globally alongside the likes of Toyota Corolla, which is the world’s best-selling car. It means there are quite a few boxes that the Honda Civic needs to check to stay a compelling option. It also brings into account the Honda Civic’s fuel economy.

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Infographic explaining the diffferent fuel types for a Honda Civic.

Fuel Requirements Based On Engine Type

2021-Present

The current Honda Civic was introduced last year with a complete redesign. Honda has started to adopt the design language, keeping the vehicle’s fuel economy in check with aerodynamics. It is achieved by reducing the amount of drag a vehicle faces if a strong wind is hammering the car’s fuel economy.

The current generation is offered with a 2.0-liter engine and a 1.5-liter turbocharged engine. Then there are CVT and Manual transmissions offered for added driver control. The fuel recommended by Honda for the current generation of Honda Civic is one with a minimum octane rating of 87— holds for all variants.

In addition to suggesting an 87-grade octane fuel type, Honda recommends using a higher grade octane for better performance of the current Honda Civic.

EngineRecommended fuel type
2.0 liter 158 HP Minimum 87 Octane
1.5 liter 180 HP TurbochargedMinimum 87 Octane

Also read: The Expected Mileage Of A Honda Civic

2015-2021

The 2016-2021 Honda Civic was also known as Generation X. This was the 10th Generation of Honda Civic that turned many heads owing to its less-than-usual styling choices. A radical design gave the 10th Generation Civic a look that none of its competitors could get their heads around.

The 10th Generation Honda Civic was offered with two engines. A 2.0-liter engine and a 1.5-liter turbocharged engine. The 2.0-Liter variant was what most of the buyers opted for and thus became a popular choice by Honda Civic lovers. This engine did help the owners win quite a few Civic vs. Corolla debates on the fuel economy subject.

Since the 2.0-liter engine was also an all-new block, the buyers had some reservations about it in the early days. Add to the equation a radical design, and it became ever so slightly harder to be convinced on buying the 10th Generation Civic, but the sales figures later proved everyone wrong.

The recommended fuel was one with a minimum octane rating of 87 as per the Honda Civic owner’s manual. And this holds for all variants of the Honda Civic. However, Honda emphasizes using fuels with higher octane ratings than 87.

EngineRecommended fuel type
2.0L inline-487-grade octane minimum
1.5L inline-487-grade octane minimum

2011-2015

The 9th Generation Honda Civic offered from 2012 till 2015 was one with smooth curves and a clear emphasis on aerodynamics. All of this resulted in better fuel economy for the car. It was a redesign from the outgoing variant and was liked and not-so-liked by buyers.

Honda offered the 9th Generation Honda Civic with two engine variants. There was a 1.8-Liter variant that was sold in large numbers in both Manual and Automatic transmission variants. Then there was a 2.4-Liter engine as well. Honda also offered a 1.5-liter hybrid engine for the 9th Generation Honda Civic and a 1.8-liter CNG variant for fleet buyers.

Honda recommends fuels with a minimum octane rating of 87 for both engines. However, it does suggest that using a 91 octane rating would be better.

EngineRecommended fuel type
1.5 liter Hybrid87-grade octane minimum
1.8 liter87-grade octane minimum
1.8 liter CNGCompressed Gas
2.4 liter87-grade octane minimum

2006-2011

The 2006 Honda Civic was a complete redesign from the outgoing model and was the first time Honda re-thought the entire car. The car was a total shift from the interior to the exterior in terms of design. The 8th Generation was responsible for bringing digital gauges back to the car interiors.

The Honda Civic 8th Generation was offered a 1.8-liter engine with a Manual and Automatic transmission and a 2.0-liter engine. The Si (short for “Sport Injection”) was provided with the 2.0-liter engine as standard. It was a more powerful engine targeted at younger buyers who wanted that extra bit of performance while being financially prudent.

Finally, Honda also offered the 8th Generation Honda Civic with a 1.3-liter Hybrid engine to stay in line with the hybrid offerings from other manufacturers. Furthermore, a CNG variant with 1.8-liter was also on sale for pocket-conscious car buyers.

The 8th generation Honda Civic owner’s manual states that Honda suggests using fuels with a minimum octane grade of 87 but recommends using higher octane grades for better performance.

EngineRecommended fuel type
1.3 liter Hybrid87-grade octane minimum
1.8 liter87-grade octane minimum
1.8 liter CNGCompressed Gas
2.0 liter87-grade octane minimum

2001-2005

Honda Civic 7th Generation was offered for sale from 2001 till 2005. The model made the Honda Civic a serious competitor in its segment. Competing with the likes of Toyota Corolla, the Honda Civic pulled off some significant sales numbers across the globe.

The 7th Generation Honda Civic was offered a 1.7-liter engine with a Manual and Automatic transmission. The minimum fuel type that Honda recommends for the 7th Generation Honda Civic is one with a minimum octane requirement of 86. As per Honda Civic’s owner’s manual, using fuels with a lower octane grade than 86 might result in engine rapping sounds and reduced engine performance.

There was a 1.3-liter Hybrid offered by Honda as well, for which Honda recommends a minimum of 86 grade octane for fuel type. Additionally, a CNG variant was also offered that would take CNG, in addition, to 86 grade octane as fuel type.

EngineRecommended fuel type
1.3 liter Hybrid87-grade octane minimum
1.7 liter87-grade octane minimum
1.7 liter CNGCompressed Gas

What Types Of Gasoline Can And Can’t Be Used?

There are other types of gasoline available. These can be RFG, Ethanol-based fuels, etc. Let’s look at each of them to see if they suit the Honda Civic and whether Honda recommends against or in favor of such fuel types.

Also read: Honda Civic Towing Capacity: Can It Tow a Trailer, Boat, or Jet Ski?

Reformulated Gasoline

Reformulated gasoline has less carbon footprint on the environment due to its greener and cleaner combustion. It minimizes smog formation and emits less toxic pollutants than other gas types. For states with air-quality concerns, reformulated gasoline is a great choice.

Honda doesn’t state any recommendations for reformulated gasoline on their owner’s manual for Honda Civic. Although the merits of using RFG are significant, the absence of any guidance from Honda leaves us less than convinced about RFG being used for Honda Civic.

Gasoline/Oxygenated Blends Or E-85

E85 is primarily used in performance vehicles due to its 85% ethanol blend with 15% regular gasoline. The cars owned by drivers with a lesser emphasis on fuel economy use E-85. E85 gives a substantial performance boost but disregards the fuel economy entirely. Therefore, using E85 is seldom recommended by manufacturers.

Honda also suggests a maximum of 15% blend of ethanol with 85% regular gasoline in the owner’s manuals for the Honda Civic. Most of the time, the vehicles that are E-85 friendly will have signs indicating their compatibility. A sign such as “Flex Fuel” or “E85 compatible vehicle” can be seen around the vehicle that works fine with E85 or a fuel cap indicating so.

For E-85 compatible vehicles, there is a set of precautions mandated due to its use with such a high-performance fuel type. These can be:

  • At the time of refueling, adding at least 5 gallons of fuel
  • Keep the vehicle operational at least for 5 minutes after refueling

Some common problems associated with E-85 compatible vehicles include:

  • Rough starting and idling in temperatures more than 90 degrees F
  • Deposit and residue formation in some vehicle owing to the use of E-85 with some additives

Gasoline With Added Materials

In the market, some gasoline types are available that come premixed with some added materials. They can consist of gasoline added with detergents, anti-corrosion agents, and some other types of chemicals. The purpose of doing so is to keep the engine clean and residue and deposit-free to some extent.

Since the detergency level varies from one offering to the other, Honda suggests using TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline in the Honda Civic. These will help maintain the engine’s health, and since TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline doesn’t contain metallic additives, it will help elongate the engine’s life.

Also read: The Exact Bolt Pattern Of A Honda Civic

Gasoline With MMT

Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is an octane enhancer used in certain fuel types. Gasoline with MMT is infamous for serious deterioration in emissions systems performance. Owing to such demerits, Honda suggests not to use gasoline types with MMT in the Honda Civic.

What If I Hear A Knocking Noise From The Engine After Refilling?

Also known as “Spark Knock,” the knocking sounds from the engine are disliked equally by young and pro drivers. Building up Carbon in combustion chambers or cylinder walls causes such knocking sounds. The key reason for carbon build-up is using a lower grade of octane than the one recommended by the manufacturer.

The best way to address this is by refueling your car with a higher grade octane fuel. If the problem persists, take your vehicle to the dealership for a maintenance check-up to address the issue.

Also read: 7 Common Problems Of A Honda Civic Hybrid

Does the Honda Civic Have Good Gas Mileage?

Honda Civic is a fan-favorite concerning its styling and reliability. Ever since it was introduced back in the 70s, it has stayed in the hearts and minds of its buyers. But does it offer the kind of fuel economy a car of its stature should be able to deliver? Let’s find out.

2021-Present

The current generation of Honda Civic went on sale in 2021. Honda claims 31 MPG in the city and 40 MPG on the highway on its website. The 2.0-liter variant tallies perfectly with this claim. The 1.5-liter turbo, however, offers better fuel economy with 33 MPG in the city and 42 on the highway.

EngineLowest Combined MPGHighest Combined MPG
2.0 Liter3140
1.5 Liter3342

2015-2021

The 10th Generation of Honda Civic was offered with a 2.0-liter engine that offered 30 MPG in the city and 38 MPG on the highway. The 1.5-liter variant achieved 32 MPG in urban traffic while 42 MPG on the highway.

EngineLowest Combined MPGHighest Combined MPG
2.0 Liter3038
1.5 Liter3242

2011-2015

For the 9th Generation Honda Civic, the most fuel-efficient option would have been the hybrid variant, but the fuel economy figures for the hybrid model are not available. The 1.8-liter variant achieved 29 MPG in the city and 37 MPG on the highway with the automatic transmission. The manual variant did 28 MPG in the city and 35 MPG on the highway.

The 2.4-liter variant was able to attain 22 MPG in the city and 31 MPG on the highway.

EngineLowest Combined MPGHighest Combined MPG
1.5 liter HybridNANA
1.8 liter Automatic2937
1.8 liter Manual2835
2.4 liter2231

2006-2011

The 8th Generation of Honda Civic offered a 1.3-liter hybrid option to achieve decent MPG numbers, but these numbers are not available online. The 1.8-liter version achieved 26 MPG in the city and 34 MPG on the highway for the 5-speed manual variant. The 5-speed automatic did 25 MPG in the city and 36 MPG on the highway. The 2.0-liter engine could barely meet 21 MPG in the city and 29 MPG on the highway.

EngineLowest Combined MPGHighest Combined MPG
1.3 liter HybridNANA
1.8 liter 5-speed Manual2634
1.8 liter 5-speed Automatic2536
2.0 liter2129

The 1.8-liter version achieved 26 MPG in the city and 34 MPG on the highway for the 5-speed manual variant. The 5-speed automatic did 25 MPG in the city and 36 MPG on the highway. The 2.0-liter engine could barely meet 21 MPG in the city and 29 MPG on the highway.

2001-2005

For the 2001-2005 Honda Civic, the fuel economy numbers for the hybrid variant are not available. However, we can safely say that it would have been the lightest on your pocket in terms of fuel economy.

The 1.7-liter variant in the manual form achieved 27 MPG in the city and 35 MPG on the highway. Its automatic version did 26 MPG in the city and 34 MPG on the highway. The 2.0-liter variant could achieve 22 MPG in the city and 28 MPG on the highway.

EngineLowest Combined MPGHighest Combined MPG
1.3 liter HybridNANA
1.7 liter 5-speed Manual2735
1.7 liter 4-speed Automatic2634
2.0 liter 5-speed Manual2228

What’s The Gas Tank Size Of A Honda Civic?

The fuel tank of the Honda Civic till the 9th Generation was 13.2 Gallons. It was reduced to 12.4 gallons for the 10th and 11th generation of Honda Civic.

Also read: Is The Honda Civic A Sports Car? (Answered)

How Much Does It Cost To Fill Up A Honda Civic?

Mississippi has the lowest fuel price at $ 3.002 per gallon for regular gasoline, and California offers fuel at the highest prices at $ 4.637 per gallon. It will cost you $ 39.64 to fill up the gas tank if you own a Honda Civic generation 9th or prior. For the 10th and 11th generation Honda Civic, the cost will be $ 37.23 to fill up the tank.

In California, the cost to fill up the gas tank will be $ 61.21 for Honda Civic 9th generation or prior. The fuel tank for the 10th and 11th generation Honda Civic will cost you $ 57.50 to fill up.

GenerationFuel tank size (Gallons)Cost (Cheapest)Cost (Most Expensive)
2021-Present12.4 Gallons$ 37.23$ 57.50
2015-202112.4 Gallons$ 37.23$ 57.50
2011-201513.2 Gallons$ 39.64$ 61.21
2006-201113.2 Gallons$ 39.64$ 61.21
2001-200513.2 Gallons$ 39.64$ 61.21

 Sources

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