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Ford Fusion Hybrid: All Common Problems You Should Know

What kind of problems does a Ford Fusion Hybrid normally have? In this blog, we’ve outlined all the most important things you should watch for when you’re in the market for a Fusion Hybrid. However, let’s first start with a quick answer:

Most commonly, the Ford Fusion Hybrid has problems with the air pressure in the tires being too low, the sunroof can leak, and the interior has several design flaws. The 2010 models have major engine breakdowns, whereas all the models have transmissions that may fail. The electronics can cause several malfunctions, pre-2011 models have squeaky suspensions, and the car is not immune to water leaks from outside.

However, that doesn’t tell the whole story. In the rest of the article, we’ll discuss every single problem in detail. Furthermore, we’ll tell you how to identify it, fix it and how much it costs to fix. Read on!

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Also read: The Complete Cost Of Maintaining A Ford

Battery Problems

The battery life of a Ford Fusion is about 8-10 years lasting about 100-150 thousand miles. If the battery has some issues before 100 thousand miles, Ford replaces it under warranty. Normally, these batteries won’t pose any major problems, but it’s time for a replacement when they do.  But most of the time, it’s just the ECU problem (The battery age sensor).

Even when the battery is still healthy, the computer might give a false reading that “because the battery is old, you better spend some money.” You need to trick the ECU instead. Some dealers know about this, but you would have to spend some time finding the right one who is willing to do this procedure because Ford doesn’t recommend this.

Even after this procedure, if the battery still causes problems and there is no issue with charging either, you might have to change the battery, which costs around $1000-$6000 depending on whether you are going for the new ones or the refurbished ones or the second-hand ones.

Exterior Problems

Tires Keep Losing Air

This is one of the common problems that occur in these sedans. It might just be the air pressure sensor that is showing an improper reading. If this is not the case, and the tire is actually leaking air, it is because fusion’s tires are relatively small and are not adequate for cushioning strong impacts from potholes or other uneven terrains.

Because of these impacts, the tires will keep on losing air little by little, and sensors will show the readings. It will be more prominent if you are driving mostly on uneven terrain. On the other hand, if you are driving on well-maintained carpeted roads or highways, it might just be a curbed wheel that causes only the damaged ones to lose pressure.

The TPMS tire pressure sensors go haywire sometimes and need a reset that calibrates all the sensors. It requires the diagnostic tool to carry out the reset procedure. To have the vehicle in tire calibration mode, you would need to turn the ignition key on, not all the way to ignition but a step before ignition (Off & On) thrice, and press the brake paddle. Again turn the key thrice, and you will enter the tire pressure sensor configuration mode.

Use the OBD scanner tool to recalibrate the tire sensors, and your issue will be resolved; if the light still doesn’t go away, you would have to change the sensors. The cost for an OBD tool to calibrate the sensors ranges from 100 dollars to 1000s of dollars. It would be best if you went for something reasonably priced.

Sunroof Leaks

If you are looking at a Ford with a sunroof, then make sure to check for any leakages. These roofs are tough to repair and cost enormous amounts of money to replace. If these are not regularly maintained and oiled, the seals get hard and cannot seal the gaps and, therefore, cause leaks.

Pour some water on the top to see if any water seeps in. Make sure that the car has a clean title. If seals are not the culprit and the water is leaking regardless, then the car might be accidental, and no matter the repair, the roof lining never comes back to its former glory.

A simple rubber seal can cost around $50, while its labor can cost about $500. And other repairs are also quite expensive.

Difficult To See During Rain Storms

In the older models, the windshield angle was quite annoying as it would not channel the water out properly and thus hinders the visibility during rainstorms and snowfall.  The newer models had this issue dealt with.

As a styling feature, the ford fusion hybrid got tiny side mirrors and thus became a double-edged sword. They do look cool but wouldn’t perform well on visibility tests. Although the mirrors have that tiny blindspot coverage mirror, it’s still inadequate.

Pedal Placement

Now, this is a design that hinders braking. To use the brake, you would have to lift your foot off the gas, moving it back and then moving to the left for braking as the brake pedal is quite high compared to the throttle. The time taken to get to the brake can be the duration that decides whether you are going to have an accident or not.

This pedal can be adjusted and would cost around $50.

Interior Problems

If you are looking at lower trim levels, i.e., the ones without the infotainment screen, you would probably have an ugly dash having lots of buttons for no reason. Higher trim levels are much more dashing than the lower ones and are more sophisticated with their simple and elegant design.

Visibility Problem

The interior was designed specifically for taller people, so the seats are rather uncomfortable for someone short (petite), and another related problem would be the lack of visibility. A short person would not judge where the front end is and would constantly struggle to get a good view.

Small Screen For The Rear Camera.

An issue with the base model is that the screen for the rear parking camera is tiny, and to overcome this size issue, the display is integrated with a zoom-in feature. Higher trim levels, on the other hand, come with a bigger display.  

The Shifting Dial

The shifting dial can sometimes be tricky while doing a 3 point turn as it does not stop with a click and would freely move to park if not carefully maneuvered.

Efficiency Leaves

If you are constantly checking the mileage numbers, keeping the efficiency leaves can sometimes be really frustrating. This graphic on the gauge cluster shows how good you are at keeping the fuel consumption as low as possible. Idling in traffic or the slightest increase of throttle can make these leaves fall off the branch.   

Inadequate Trunk Space

These sedans don’t provide enough space in the trunk due to the placement of the battery pack. The battery takes a lot of space and leaves an irregular compartment, which is not feasible for large suitcases or any other large packages.

Engine Problems

Ford Fusion Hybrids do pretty well especially models post-2016. The 2010 models are notorious though, they are known to have major engine breakdowns, so it’s better to stay away from the 2010 models if they have clunking noises coming from the engine, and preferably go for the 2011 ones or above.

Check for any oil or fluid leaks, especially around the head gasket, as the valve cover is plastic and would leak after some time. These gaskets cost around $50, and by adding the labor, the price goes up to $200-300 depending on the model and the shop from which you are having it repaired.

Transmission Problems

Stop Safely Now

The car runs for about 8 seconds and then shuts off with this red triangle of death, and this “Stop Safely Now” sign appears. Most of the time, these are the symptoms of transmission failure. After running the OBD scan tool, we clear all the codes to see which ones are relevant, then starting the engine to see the codes again.

A used transmission can cost around $700 while new ones are more than $3000. The prices might fluctuate depending on the model and region.

Now for a typical failure, we see the following.

  • SOBDMC – P0C2F – Internal control module drive motor speed sensor performance
  • SOBDMC – P1920 – Engine speed signal
  • PCM – U1010 – Invalid internal control module monitoring data received from the hybrid powertrain control module.

There is already a TSB on this issue that states the procedure for the repair, and it tells us that this failure requires a replacement of the whole transmission assembly or changed with a revised transmission kit. This problem might not have happened if the fluid levels were maintained and the noise was accounted for, which was coming from the transmission.

SOBDMC – P0C2F

This indicates that the traction motor and/or the starter motor are not in sync per the control module.

SOBDMC – P1920

This code indicates that the starter/generator motor is not spinning properly, creating an impaired alignment with the gasoline motor. Normally it would be the dampener problem or an input shaft failure causing the engine not to start. But if the engine does start and then shuts off, it’s the starter motor.

Also read: Ford Fusion Transmissions: Overview, Problems, Fluids

Suspension Problems

If you are looking at the older models, 2011 or older, you most definitely would encounter the ones with creaking and squeaking noises coming from under the vehicle. These noises are due to the worn-out suspension components. These noises will be prominent while driving, whereas the engine or transmission noises can be heard even idle.

If the car tilts a bit too much during turns, it will be the sway bar issue that costs around $200. And if you hear clunking noises while going over potholes, it would be the shocks/struts that can cost around $500, the ride will be harsh, and the vehicle would feel unstable.

Electronics Problems

There have been many recalls due to failed sensors. Many people complain about these sensors being consistent in causing headaches. The check engine light keeps on popping even after fixing an issue. It becomes a non-ending spiral that keeps on going forever. 

Also read: Types Of Gas A Ford Fusion Takes (All Generations)

Power Seats

These power seats are known to fail, so check all the different settings and see if it is moving without a problem. These often pose issues due to failed motor that would cost around $400 to fix.

Putting Aftermarket Electronics

Putting aftermarket mods into the ford fusion hybrid is not a very good decision. The electronics do not work as adequately as they would in other vehicles, so it is recommended to have the factory fitted only.

P0456

This is one of the most common codes that one can get on the Fusion related to the evaporative leak or the purge control valve. There is a TSB available for this known issue.  Before changing the purge control valve, it is good to loosen up the fuel filler flap that might have some debris clogged up.

These flaps are known to trap debris, which can be removed by using the emergency fueling funnel located in the side flap of the trunk. Clean that funnel to clear the debris and use pressurized air to blow out the particles around the flap. And while doing so, spray a little WD-40 as well and repeat the whole process several times.

After repeating the above-mentioned process, if the issue is still not resolved, you would have to change the purge control valve, which costs around $100, and after adding the labor cost, the price will go up to $150.

Weather compatibility

If you live in a cold region that remains cold throughout the year, this is not the vehicle of choice. These hybrids tend to have poor mpg in colder regions as compared to the warmer areas. Not only will you have lower mpg, but you will also have difficulty maneuvering this car in snow as it is not designed for snowy terrain.

In winter, the mpg might even drop down to 28, but if you prefer this sedan in winter anyway and keep the mpg as high as possible, do not warm the engine before starting the commute, sit and drive right away. This trick will help you keep the mileage high.

Leakages

Water Is Leaking Into The Cabin

Due to the poor design, the water from the A/C, instead of draining out of the vehicle, comes into the cabin via the insulation coverings on the front passenger side. Make sure to check the carpets for any moisture and run the air conditioning to double the problem.

To get rid of this problem, you would have to take out the seats and carpet, get to that area where the leakage is, and put another insulation covering on it. While you are at it, extending that drainage pipe a little by attaching another hose to it is better. If the carpets are completely soaked and you are paying a professional to do the job, then you might as well have your car detailed.

The in-depth detailing of the car requires the same steps of removing the seats and carpet; while they are at it, you can put insulation in that place, two birds with one stone. And for extending the pipe to prevent future leaks, you would have to pay a professional.

Air Conditioning Is Not Working

One of the common problems in this car is the freon leakage due to holes in the A/C hoses. These holes are created by rubbing two hoses with each other when the rubber piece has fallen or moved from its place, which is responsible for keeping these hoses in place. It is not recommended to take this issue to the dealership as they would charge a lot to fix it.

These hoses can easily be replaced with new ones and have filled with freon within $300, while the dealerships ask around $800 for this fix.