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The Exact Bolt Pattern Of A Dodge Charger

We’ve written extensively about the Canadian/American-made Dodge Charger and numerous questions you can have about this car. Today, we will talk about the information you need to have to select the correct new tires or rims for your Charger. Specifically, we’ll take a look at the bolt pattern for each generation. Let’s start with a quick answer:

All Dodge Chargers manufactured between 2005 – present have a bolt pattern of 5 x 4.53 inches (5x115mm). Chargers manufactured between 1983 – 1987 have a bolt pattern of 4 x 3.94 inches (4x100mm). Chargers manufactured between 1966 – 1978 have a bolt pattern of  5×4.5 inches (5×114.3mm).

However, that certainly doesn’t tell the whole story. Below we’ve outlined the bolt pattern in more detail for each generation. We also discuss what lugs/bolts are used precisely, the exact diameter of the center bore hub, and the torque specifications of the bolts. Finally, we also have information about each engine type’s exact tire size and rim size. This way, you should know precisely what you can and cannot buy. Read on!

Also read: The Expected Mileage Of A Dodge Charger

Wheel Fitment Specifications Per Generation

To fit a wheel properly on your Charger, you’ll need to know more aspects than just the bolt pattern. Below we’ve outlined all the factors you should be aware of for each generation of the Charger. These include: center bore diameter, wheel tightening torque, whether lug nuts or bolts are used, and the thread size of the bolts.

We also want to clarify that the below-listed specifications are the same for all models within that generation. The Charger, of course, comes in different trim levels and engine options. However, these bolt patterns, lugs used, and torque specifications do not change for other models within a generation.

Furthermore, we also listed the exact tire and rim size used with each engine option to give you a precise idea of what tires you can and cannot buy.

2015 – Present-day

Dodge Chargers manufactured between 2015 – Present-day have a center bore of 71.6 mm and five lug nuts with a thread size of M14 x 1.5. These bolts need to be tightened with 130 lb-ft (176 Nm).

  • Chargers with a 3.6L engine and 2WD (SXT) have a standard tire size of 215/65R17 and a rim size of 7Jx17 ET24. The 300hp version (GT) has a tire size of 245/45ZR20 and rim size of 8Jx20 ET24. The AWD version has a tire size of 235/55R19 and a rim size of 7.5Jx19 ET55. The Pursuit version of this engine type has tire size of 225/60R18 and a rim size of 7.5Jx18 ET25.
  • Chargers with a 5.7L engine have a standard tire size of 245/45R20, or 245/45ZR20 and a rim size of 8Jx20 ET24, and 9Jx20 ET22.5. The Pursuit version has a tire size of 225/60R18 and a rim size of 7.5Jx18 ET25.
  • Chargers with a 6.4L engine (Scat Pack) have a standard tire size of 245/45ZR20 and a rim size of 9Jx20 ET22.5 whereas the Scat Pack Widebody has a standard tire size of 305/35ZR20 and rim size of 11Jx20 ET-2.5.

2011 – 2014

Dodge Chargers manufactured between 2011 – 2014 have a center bore of 71.6 mm and five lug nuts with a thread size of M14 x 1.5. These bolts need to be tightened with 130 lb-ft (176 Nm).

  • Chargers with a 3.6L engine and 2WD have a standard tire size of 215/65R17, or 235/55R18 and a rim size of 7Jx17 ET22, or 7.5Jx18 ET24. The AWD has a standard tire size of 235/55R19 and a rim size of 7.5Jx19 ET55.
  • Chargers with a 5.7L engine have a standard tire size of 235/55R18, or 245/45R20 and a rim size of 7.5Jx18 ET24, and 8Jx20 ET24.

2005 – 2010

Dodge Chargers manufactured between 2005 -2010 have a center bore of 71.6 mm and five lug nuts with a thread size of M14 x 1.5. These bolts need to be tightened with 110 lb-ft (149 Nm) for the RWD and Daytona and 140 lb-ft (190 Nm) for the Police editions.

  • Chargers with a 2.7L engine have a standard tire size of 215/65R17 and a rim size of 7Jx17 ET22.
  • Chargers with a 3.5L engine have a standard tire size of 215/65R17, or 235/55R18 and a rim size of 7Jx17 ET22, or 7.5Jx18 ET24.
  • Chargers with a 5.7L engine have a standard tire size of 235/55R18, or 245/45R20 and a rim size of 7.5Jx18 ET24, and 8Jx20 ET24.

1983 – 1987

The 2.2L Dodge Charger manufactured between 1983 – 1987 has a center bore of 57.1 mm and four lug nuts with a thread size of M12 x 1.5 that need to be tightened with 95 lb-ft (129 Nm). This Charger has a standard tire size of 175/75R13 and a rim size of 5Jx13 ET35.

1966 – 1978

Dodge Chargers manufactured between 1966 – 1978 have a center bore of 71.6 mm and five lug nuts with 1/2″ – 20 UNF thread size. Furthermore, all engine types have the following tires sizes with the corresponding rim sizes:

  • 195/75SR14 and 5.5Jx14 ET5
  • 215/70SR14 and 5.5Jx14 ET5
  • 225/70SR14 and 6Jx14 ET0
  • 245/60SR15 and 7Jx15 ET0

However, the 7.0 and 7.2L Hemi engines have a standard tire size of 215/70SR14, 225/70SR14, or 225/65SR15 with a rim size of 5.5Jx14 ET5, 6Jx14 ET0, or 7Jx15 ET0.

Also read: 19 Common Problems Of A Dodge Charger

Retightening The Bolts

After you’ve disassembled the wheels, it’s time to put them back on the Charger. However, it’s essential to know how to do this exactly to avoid dangerous situations. Dodge has provided information about this in its owner’s manual.

As seen in the picture below, Dodge advises you to tighten the bolt in a star pattern if you have five lug nuts and go in a different pattern if you have four lug nuts.

You do this by tightening all the nuts with a wheel wrench first. I like this wrench on Amazon in particular because it fits all bolt sizes for cars and trucks and is quite affordable. Please make sure only to tighten them halfway; otherwise, you’ll run into problems.

After that, you use the wheel wrench to tighten them entirely on the second round to the specified torque requirements.

After driving 25 miles (40 kilometers), it’s essential to check the tightness of the nuts once more. If you notice a lug nut is not fully tightened anymore, tighten them once more and repeat the process. If you see this is happening over and over again, the wheel will need to be replaced.

Also read: How Well Does A Dodge Charger Drive In Snow? (Answered)

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